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Never forget that many died instituting and defending it’s principals so that you may live today to enjoy and benefit from them today, but to you the citizens of America – there is a duty that comes with this, hence the title of this post!

and FYI:

Former SUNY Fredonia political science professor to speak on Constitution Day

September 14, 2013 The OBSERVER

Former SUNY Fredonia political science professor Kevin J. McMahon will visit campus Tuesday, Constitution Day. Currently a professor of political science at Trinity College in Hartford, Mass. will discuss his books and research which examine the presidency, as well as the political origins and consequences of Supreme Court decisions. The presentation will take place from 3:30 p.m. to 5 p.m. in room 204 of the Williams Center.

Constitution Day (or Citizenship Day) is an American federal observance that recognizes the adoption of the United States Constitution and those who have become U.S. citizens.

more…

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County: Delay further salary talks

June 26, 2013 The OBSERVER Save | Comments (1) | Post a comment |

Chautauqua County legislators are not expected to take up the Salary Review Commission’s proposal during its meeting tonight, according to WDOE. That’s a good thing.

But it needs to go one step further – do not look at the fairy tale plan, which includes raises of nearly 30 percent, again. Do not look at it until there has been some drastic change to the county in terms of business, development, economics and population. When those pieces start to show an improvement – not a decline – then look to give elected officials raises.

Name an accomplishment by any elected official over recent years when businesses have exited the county as well as residents?

Finding funds to clean and maintain the lake is not one of them. That’s a gift from the state. How about magically finding $10 million in funds last year? Another gift.

What about the complaints about state mandates? Complaining is what some politicians do too well.

Our county’s population has dipped to under 134,000 residents. In 1980, it was 150,000. How do you justify nearly 30 percent raises to county officials when all we have seen is decline in the last three decades?

This, ultimately, is how you know government leaders are out of touch.

Salary increases off agenda

June 26, 2013 By LIZ SKOCZYLAS  – OBSERVER Mayville Bureau , Save | Post a comment |

MAYVILLE – The Chautauqua County Legislature will not be discussing salary increases during its monthly meeting today.

Despite four local laws establishing salary levels for elected officials being on the agenda, it was announced the laws will not be discussed. According to an email from Kathy Tampio, legislative clerk, the purpose for the change in the agenda is to enable further review and analysis by all members of the legislature.

Legislative Chairman Jay Gould, R-Ashville, made the decision to pull the local laws off the agenda.

“There hasn’t been enough debate on (the local laws). There must be a better way,” Gould said. “Maybe there ought to be another way, other than a citizen’s committee, such as a cost-of-living every year, or every two years or something. (The local laws) weren’t enacted in (2008) and they won’t be enacted in (2013)

more…

Read more on our OCDB Issues page here.

“Minority Leader Robert Whitney, D-Jamestown, said he did not see a problem with the proposed increase to salaries.”

…report that recommends 28.8 percent pay raises for the county executive and county clerk and raises for the legislature that result in paying more for a 19 member legislature than a 25 member legislature. Are they joking? Surely, there must be a better recommendation coming, right? For starters, commission members recommend a $3,000 base pay increase to legislators. That increase, if approved, would increase the total base pay from $225,000 for a 25 member legislature to $228,000 for a 19 member legislature…

Oh but we must reduce the size of the legislature to save tax payers money! Having gone from 25 seats to 19 @ $9000/each we will save $54,000/year. Oh wait this is only the first year for that, we haven’t saved a dime yet, and already it’s being suggested that those savings be reversed, and then some? Outrageous!

Salary Suggestions Are Ludicrous

June 16, 2013 The Post-Journal Save | Comments (5) | Post a comment |

Should elected officials in Chautauqua County receive pay raises?

It’s an interesting question that receives no consideration in a series of recommendations handed up from the county’s Salary Review Commission to the Chautauqua County Legislature. The recommendations will be discussed this week by county legislators during committee meetings, including the Administrative Services Committee at 5:30 p.m. Monday.

Not answering the question of the raises’ necessity is the commission’s first mistake, but it is far from the last one it makes in a report that recommends 28.8 percent pay raises for the county executive and county clerk and raises for the legislature that result in paying more for a 19 member legislature than a 25 member legislature.

Are they joking? Surely, there must be a better recommendation coming, right?

For starters, commission members recommend a $3,000 base pay increase to legislators. That increase, if approved, would increase the total base pay from $225,000 for a 25 member legislature to $228,000 for a 19 member legislature. Plus, the commission’s report seems to say legislators should be paid more because legislators no longer receive health insurance, a perk that was eliminated in 2010 at a savings of between $140,000 and $160,000. It is also a perk that many current legislators never received and its inclusion in the commission’s report is illogical.

The commission’s flawed thinking continues when it comes to the county executive, clerk and sheriff pay raises. Commission members reviewed Consumer Price Index information for the past 10 years and added up the inflation rate from 2003 to 2013. That number, 28.8 percent, was then used to determine the raises for the county executive, county clerk and county sheriff. The county executive would go from earning $85,000 to $109,480 while the clerk will go from $53,000 to $68,264. Because the sheriff’s salary has been increased over the years, the commission is recommending an increase from $82,500 to $87,450, the lower of the salary ranges it discussed.

Legislator John Runkle, R-Gerry and Audit and Control Committee chairman, has already gone on the record saying he doesn’t think any elected official should receive a pay increase right now. We trust his fellow legislators will follow his lead and oppose these ridiculous recommendations.

As a taxpayer, when was the last time you received a 28.8 percent pay increase? When was the last time you last received a county property tax increase? Honest answers to those questions put the outlandish report from the Salary Review Commission in perspective.

Dollars And Sense

Salary Review Committee Recommendations Receive Mixed Reviews From Legislators

June 15, 2013 By Liz Skoczylas (lskoczylas@post-journal.com) , Save | Comments (1) | Post a comment |

MAYVILLE – Salary recommendations for elected officials will be discussed next week, and already legislators are expressing mixed feelings.

As per the county charter, a citizen’s review committee is charged with making recommendations regarding salaries of elected officials. The committee meets prior to November elections to review the salaries of similar elected officials in other counties throughout the state, in order to compare them to those in Chautauqua County. The Salary Review Committee recently wrapped up meetings, and turned its recommendations in to the legislature to be voted on.

Monday, the Administrative Services Committee will be the first to review the recommendations. Thursday, the Audit and Control Committee will also review the recommendations.

The Salary Review Committee recommended that, as of Jan. 1, 2014, base salary for legislators increase from $9,000 to $12,000 per year. It also recommended the chairman of the legislature receive an additional $8,000; majority and minority leaders an additional $1,000; assistant majority and minority leaders an additional $500; each committee chairman an additional $1,000; and each ranking member of committees an additional $250.

For the county executive position, the committee recommended an annual salary of $109,480, effective Jan. 1, 2014. According to seethroughny.net, County Executive Greg Edwards received a salary of $85,000 in 2012.

The committee recommended that the county clerk position salary be $68,264, beginning Jan. 1, 2014. Sandy Sopak, current county clerk, received a salary of $53,640 in 2011, according to seethroughny.net.

The committee also recommended an increase for the position of county sheriff. In 2011, Sheriff Joseph Gerace received a salary of $83,740, according to seethroughny.net. Beginning Jan. 1, 2014, the Salary Review Committee recommended a salary of $87,450.

“What the committee did on three of them, were cost of living since the last time they got a raise. That’s what they did on the county executive, clerk and the sheriff,” said Legislative Chairman Jay Gould, R-Ashville. “On legislative recommendations they took, I believe, half the money they saved from going from 25 to 19 (legislators), and divided that up amongst the 19, because there will be more work.”

The last time the Salary Review Commission met was in 2008, when it made two recommendations. The first recommendation had three parts: The first was that there would be no grandfathering of existing salaries or benefits based on longevity of service or current status; the second was regarding health insurance; the third increased legislator salaries from $9,000 to $10,000.

The second recommendation by the committee in 2008 suggested a reduction in the legislature, from 25 to 17 members. Additionally, the recommendation included health insurance changes. It also would increase legislator salaries from $9,000 to $15,000 if the number of legislators was decreased.

“(Last time, the recommendations) were voted down, quite strongly if I recall,” Gould said.

According to Majority Leader Larry Barmore, R-Gerry, legislators have not received a salary increase in many years.

“I don’t know right where I’m standing right now. I do know it has been an awful long time since any of those positions had any salary change, other than the sheriff,” he said. “It’s never a good time, it’s never a popular thing to do, no matter what level you’re at. I do know that our county executive is among, if not, the lowest-paid county executive in New York state. Our county clerk, the same situation.”

Barmore suggested perhaps phasing in salary changes, rather than making them all at once, a matter he said the legislature would have to look at more closely.

Minority Leader Robert Whitney, D-Jamestown, said he did not see a problem with the proposed increase to salaries.

“I know it’s a big jump, but there hasn’t been a jump in how many years?” Whitney asked. “There was a lot of experience on that committee. I’m sure people are going to complain about the recommendations, but then again I don’t see any primaries where everybody’s trying to run now, because it’s such a great deal. So, I guess I don’t have a problem with it. It’s not too late for somebody to jump in if they think it’s a great deal.”

One legislator, though, is being vocal in his opposition to the recommended salary changes.

“While I appreciate the hard work that the commission has done in this matter, I can’t really, in good conscience, support any kind of pay raise for Chautauqua County elected officials,” John Runkle, R-Stockton, told The Post-Journal. “It’s no secret that this county is not thriving economically and jobs are being lost and companies are leaving the area because of high taxes. To suggest such things as 25 percent pay raises for county legislators in such an environment, to me, is just unreasonable. It flies in the face of what we should be doing, and that is cutting taxes and acting in a fiscally-responsible manner.”

A phone call to county executive Greg Edwards was not immediately returned Friday.

The Public Facilities Committee meets Monday at 4 p.m. The Audit and Control Committee meets Thursday at 8:35 a.m. Both committees meet in room 331 of the Gerace Office Building in Mayville.

Should county officials who are elected get pay raises?

ChautauquaToday.com

Yes  8.11%

No  86.49%   

Undecided  5%

Should the positions of county exeucitve, legislator and clerk receive a raise?

Post-Journal.com

  1. Yes 15%
  2. No 85%

Read more on our OCDB Issues page here.

Support NRG Repowering – Contact The PSC Now

By Todd J. Tranum  – President and CEO of the Chautauqua County Chamber of Commerce & Executive director of the Manufacturers Association of the Southern Tier

In order for the project to move forward, the Public Service Commission must vote to allow the NRG repowering.  This is a time for all businesses and residents in Chautauqua County to make their voices heard on this issue.  Please write to the PSC now.  You can send support letters to:  Chairman Garry A. Brown & Acting Secretary Jeffrey Cohen, NYS Public Service Commission, Agency Bldg. 3, Empire State Plaza, Albany, NY 12223.  Please reference Case # 12-E-0577.  In addition, you may send comments and concerns to Hon. Andrew Cuomo, Governor, New York State, Executive Chamber, NYS Capitol, Albany, NY 12224.  If you prefer to email, you can find a link directly to the PSC’s comment page for this case on the Chamber’s website at www.chautauquachamber.org.  Thank you.

Senator Young requests local hearing on NRG

New York State Sen. Catharine Young has filed a request with the state’s Public Service Commission that it hold a hearing in the local area on the future of the NRG Dunkirk plant and its repowering proposal.

“It is only right that the members of the community that are directly impacted by these proposals be given a voice in this critical matter, and granted a hearing with those making the decisions,” Young wrote PSC Chairman Garry A. Brown. “Therefore, I request that you arrange to have at least one public hearing in Dunkirk or its immediate surrounding area as soon as possible, within the timeframe of the 45-day public comment period…

“We’ve got a lot of comments and support. I know the 4,000 people who signed the petition was really wonderful. We did send the signatures to the Public Service Commission just to show them the broad depth of support for the repowering project, but even if people signed a petition it still would be very helpful for people to send in their own letter also.”

Letters may be sent to: Chairman Garry A. Brown and Acting Secretary Jeffrey Cohen, NYS Public Service Commission Agency Bldg. 3, Empire State Plaza Albany, NY 12223. Be sure to refer to case number 12-E-0577.

Public comments and letters may also be submitted to the PSC online by going to documents.dps.ny.gov/public/Comments/PublicComments.aspx?MatterCaseNo=12-E-0577.

Read the full articles on our OCDB issues page here.

Considering our last post, now reflect on this stat. Not only does our county school spending fall into this highest in the nation trend, but in fact many of our schools spending is even higher yet, a full 100% higher than the national average or more! Now you may say we have some good schools in our county, sure, but at what cost considering that the results they produce may be better then some, but certainly aren’t a 100% better than any of them. If you want to go and research what all this spending gets us, sadly you’ll find in most categories that the results are only average.

NY number-one in school spending — again

May 21, 2013 E.J. McMahon
While voters across New York go to polls to determine the fate of proposed school district budgets, the Census Bureau has just released its annual breakdown of public school spending. As of 2010-11, New York once again topped the list, at $19,076 per pupil — a whopping 81 percent above the national average of $10,560 per pupil. The gulf between the Empire State and the national spending average has widened from 63 percent as of 2005-06.

Reflecting an economic and fiscal pinch in the wake of the recession, total public education spending in the United States actually declined in 2011 for the first time since the Census Bureau began collecting annual data in 1977, the Bureau reported. But New York bucked that trend, increasing spending by $458 per pupil, or 2.5 percent.

(more…)

In other news:

Brocton, Westfield OK merger plan  for vote May 22, 2013 Good move as “both sides” overwhelmingly support moving forward.

Bemus Point Budget Fails May 22, 2013 Although close, good for those voters who prevailed. All other budgets in the south county schools passed.

Approved! May 22, 2013 In the north county, all the schools budgets passed. One thing you can gleen from article and the one preceeding, as usual, is what a pathetic voter turn out in most districts for such an important issue.

Now look at this Post-journal Poll results so far today:

Are you happy with the way your school district manages its budget?

  1. Yes 25%
  2. No 75%

How ironic! Guess a lot of you “no” votes didn’t bother to cast a real vote yesterday huh?

As NYS and it’s counties continue to have some of the highest property taxes nationally, a major component is of course the portion that is your School Taxes. Please vote on your school budgets, we say mostly NO because most of them contain increases, though there are a few we would vote Yes as you’ll see below. We hope you have also looked at Board candidates and where there are choices, that you vote for the best one (that will oppose irresponsibility at the state level, oppose federal intervention and dictates such as common core, and who will support an agenda that truly puts proper education and the kids first, not the unions, not special interests, and not radical social agendas). As for the budgets, consider the following before you vote:

Countywide in 2006 we had 21956 students, and as of 2013 we have 20338 students. This equals an enrollment decline of 1618 students.

At an (2006) average cost of $15974/student, that would equal a decline in spending of $25,845,932.

However, that is not the case as total countywide spending in 2006 was $350,728,170, by 2009 with (unnecessary) increases in Federal and State aid, spending (like drunken sailors) was up to $427,049,005 (note that some of this increase was due to a couple of major building projects such as with Southwestern, but then we must point out that in the same course of events, total debt of $274,351,873 in 2006 had climbed to $322,788,619 by 2009). Our schools systems across the county are almost in as much debt collectively as they are spending.

Since then the public has got wise, cracked down on the school systems, and to a degree gotten some of this spending under control. However, the proposed spending this year is $376,204,605 is still almost $26 million higher than 2006 yet with 1618 fewer students! [Note that we also have the 2% property tax cap now but it’s kind of a joke with respect to the schools. Heck they can raise their levy by 6% and not violate the cap because of all the exclusions they are granted, but we digress as the whole TaxCap issue is another story.]

So what’s to explain this you might ask? We submit it is a combination of a few things we will not be shy about saying: 1- In past years the public school unions have been greedy and out of control, pay and benefits have exploded, contracts overly generous, Taylor laws and Triborough amendments giving them special protections, it has hurt us taxpayers, continues to do so, and we need more reforms therein. 2- The public sector state pension system remains a ticking bomb and a major contributor. Again generous and “guaranteed” benefit are at work and all shortfalls to the pension system are simply made up by cranking up the employer (municipality) contribution rate (or in other words taxpayers are taxed more) 3- We have 18 school “administrations” and whereas the union factor is a part of this equation with respect to some of the administration staff, having 18 administrations in of itself is a problem. Just consider that 18 Superintendents at an average of $125,000/year (Southwestern’s is presently about $155,000) each, equals $2,250,000 in spending, just on 18 (non-union, by the way) people. How about we have one County superintendent for $225,000, saving us $2,000,000/year and we consolidate the administrations overall saving us $millions and millions more. In addition, right size overall staffing in schools to the degree it still needs to be done (some has been done over the last few years), and freeze salaries and benefits for the “tenured” teachers until the playing field levels out (we have some of the highest compensated public school teachers in the entire country). Oh and that pension issue, well the baby steps taken with tier 6 for example are just that, and we need yet more reform. However, now we have this pension smoothing scheme, it is a scam, terribly irresponsible, and it will likely eventually explode that ticking pension bomb we alluded to above.

{Note on highest average teacher salaries nationwide: Please do not let certain folks try to convince you that this analysis or others are skewed by NYC schools data. In Southwestern alone, as of 2010 payroll, there were 30 people making over $70,000/year plus benefits, with 5 more ready to hit that level in the next payroll year. At this level of compensation (for what is less than 52 week 40 hour per week work), in a matter of only a decade these folks are millionaires, on your tax dime!}

{{Source: The current figures were taken from the article below and all other figures / prior year figures come directly from the NYS Comptroller’s Office}}

IF YOU’RE NOT UPSET YET AND READY TO VOTE AGAINST YOUR INCREASING SCHOOL BUDGET (ESPECIALLY THOSE INCREASING BY MORE THAN 2%), THERE IS SOMETHING WRONG WITH YOU!

School Budget Facts And Figures

May 19, 2013 The Post-Journal Save | Comments (1) | Post a comment |

[OCDB emphasis added – Cost per student]

CHAUTAUQUA COUNTY

SOUTHWESTERN

Proposed spending: $25,857,975 – a .46 percent increase

Proposed tax levy: $12,379,950 – a 2.44 percent increase

Enrollment: 1,430 students / Cost per student $18082

Board elections: one three-year term up for election; incumbent William Burk is running unopposed

[Consider: 2006 Enrollment 1609 students, Spending $23,571,756, Cost per student $14649]

FREWSBURG

Proposed spending: $15,506,279 – a 3.35 percent increase

Proposed tax levy: $4,982,166 – a 2.1 percent incease

Enrollment: 848 students / Cost per student $18285

Board elections: three three-year terms and one one-year term up for election; five candidates running: Eric Wright, Hannah Hayes, Randall Wiltsie, Janet Black and Jason Ruhlman

CASSADAGA VALLEY

Proposed spending: $19,967,698 – a .15 percent decrease

Proposed tax levy: $5,097,060 – a 1.98 percent increase

Enrollment: 1,011 students / Cost per student $19750

Board elections: one five-year term and one two-year vacancy up for election; three candidates running: incumbent Jeanne Oag is unopposed, Sandra Barker and Daniel Pavlock are running for the two-year term

CHAUTAUQUA LAKE

Proposed spending: $19,535,232 – a 2.15 percent increase

Proposed tax levy: $10,806,020 – a 3.72 percent increase

Enrollment: 972 students / Cost per student $20097

Board elections: information not available

PINE VALLEY

Proposed spending: $15,019,537 – a 2.7 percent increase

Proposed tax levy: $3,236,080 – a 3 percent increase

Enrollment: 607 students / Cost per student $24743

Board elections: three three-year terms up for election, four candidates running: incumbents are Jo Anne Anderson, Janie Waag and Lawrence Zollinger, challenger is Angelo Graziano

CLYMER

Proposed spending: $9,750,795 – a 3.48 percent increase

Proposed tax levy: $3,966,909 – a 2.56 percent increase

Enrollment: 435 students / Cost per student $22415

Board elections: no contested seats

DUNKIRK

Proposed spending: $40,923,396 – a 1.79 percent increase

Proposed tax levy: $9,614,516 – no change

Enrollment: 2,030 students / Cost per student $20159

Board elections: one one-year term and two three-year terms up for election; three candidates running: incumbents are Kenneth Kozlowski and Linda Guy, the other candidate is Bridget Majka

BEMUS POINT

Proposed spending: $13,119,825 – a 5.17 percent increase

Proposed tax levy: $7,900,064 – a 5.67 percent increase

Enrollment: 772 students / Cost per student $16994

Board elections: two three-year terms up for election, two candidates running: the incumbent is Lisa Allenson and the other candidate is Barry Swanson

FALCONER

Proposed spending: $21,647,772 – a 2.53 percent increase

Proposed tax levy: $6,856,116 – a 3.45 percent increase

Enrollment: 1,209 students / $17905

Board elections: one five-year term and one one-year term up for election, two candidates running: the incumbent is Todd Beckerink and the other candidate is Christopher Hannon

SILVER CREEK

Proposed spending: $20,477,618 – a 3.25 percent increase

Proposed tax levy: $5,661,824 – a 2.7 percent increase

Enrollment: 1,094 students / Cost per student $18718

Board elections: one five-year term and one one-year unexpired term up for election, two candidates running: the incumbent is Greg Cole and the other candidate is Steven Boothe

FORESTVILLE

Proposed spending: $11,483,188 – a .31 percent decrease

Proposed tax levy: $3,622,430 – a 3.9 percent increase

Enrollment: 524 students /  Cost per student $21914

Board elections: one four-year term up for election, incumbent Bruce Ellis is running unopposed

PANAMA

Proposed spending: $12,198,067 – a 1.66 percent increase

Proposed tax levy: $3,461,172 – no change

Enrollment: 567 students / Cost per student $21513

Board elections: two incumbents are running unopposed

JAMESTOWN

Proposed spending: $75,369,680 – a 1.86 percent decrease

Proposed tax levy: $14,641,567 – no change

Enrollment: 5,220 students / Cost per student $14438

Board elections: two three-year terms up for election, three candidates running: incumbents are Joe DiMaio and Patrick Slagle and the challenger is Todd Rushforth

FREDONIA

Proposed spending: $28,754,508 – a 2.99 percent increase

Proposed tax levy: $15,079,019 – a 2.98 percent increase

Enrollment: 1,474 students / Cost per student $19507

Board elections: one term up for election, incumbent Roberta Coniglio is running unopposed

BROCTON

Proposed spending: $15,298,333 – a 3.97 percent increase

Proposed tax levy: $4,486,946 – a 1.99 percent increase

Enrollment: 618 students / Cost per student $24754

Board elections: two five-year terms up for election; three candidates running: Jim Farrell, Beth Jagoda and Robert Mead-Colgrove

RIPLEY

Proposed spending: $8,370,065 – a 1.75 percent decrease

Proposed tax levy: $2,140,341 – a 4.08 percent decrease

Enrollment: 325 students / Cost per student $25754

Board elections: two three-year terms up for election, three candidates running: incumbent Frederick Krause is running unopposed for one seat, the other two candidates are Wanda Bentley and Paul McCutcheon

SHERMAN

Proposed spending: $8,771,623 – a 1.87 percent decrease

Proposed tax levy: $2,398,032 – a 4 percent increase

Enrollment: 460 students /  Cost per student $19068

Board elections: one five-year term up for election, two candidates running: the incumbent is Emily Kidd and the challenger is Tim Sears

WESTFIELD

Proposed spending: $14,153,014 – a 2.17 percent increase

Proposed tax levy: $5,678,406 – a 4.49 percent increase

Enrollment: 742 students / Cost per student $19074

Board elections: one five-year term up for election, incumbent Steve Cockram is running unopposed

  • RELATED, SEE ALSO:

Schools Prep For Budget Votes

May 19, 2013 By Gavin Paterniti (gpaterniti@post-journal.com) , The Post-Journal

Ready to vote: School budgets, board seats up Tuesday

May 19, 2013 OBSERVER Staff Report Save | Comments (4) | Post a comment |

Rotten to the ‘Core?’

May 19, 2013 The OBSERVER Save | Comments (4) | Post a comment |

By DEANN NELSON, Member STTPP

Funds, staff keep shrinking

May 19, 2013 The OBSERVER Save | Comments (18) | Post a comment |

For some, it was an unsettling tone. Cassadaga Valley music teacher John Cross and another 75 residents attended last week’s Board of Education meeting to voice their concerns regarding the elimination of a music teacher position in the district.

“I’ve done everything I can over the last four weeks (to convince the board not to cut music). … I don’t want to go in there and blindside anyone,” Cross said. “It needs to be said. I’ve been around here longer than anyone. I am not a public speaker, a political organizer, or a rabble rouser.”

His sympathetic story is one we hear annually at a number of districts. And Cross is correct. The cuts are not fair. But neither is the expenses associated with the Cassadaga Valley music program.

According to seethroughny.net, three music teachers in the district receive more than $275,000 in salary. Total compensation of the music teachers, including health benefits and pensions, equates to $386,000. That’s about 10 times more, according to published reports, than most professional musicians will earn if they are lucky.

Is that cost sustainable to a school district of just a little more than 1,000 students? Absolutely not. But if you do not hear concessions offered by staff members in the district to add another position, what other choice does the board have?

One option residents have is to defeat Tuesday’s proposal that goes before voters, which would give the board the option of revisiting its budget. The bad news is the board could decide to put an austerity plan into effect, which is 2 percent less than what is proposed and usually adds to the unhappiness.

No district in this county of 17 1/2 is riding a wave of optimism. Enrollments are declining, programming is suffering and expenses keep rising. At least Ripley – the smallest of all our county districts – did something about it. Voters there approved tuitioning their students in grade seven to 12 to Chautauqua Lake. It stabilized costs, lowered taxes and adds opportunities for their students.

What about the other districts?

It is more of the same. Bare-bones plans. Excuses of state mandates and fewer courses for the students.

Which gets us back to the reduction at Cassadaga Valley. It will not get better there – or any other local district in the future. But joining forces, as Ripley and Chautauqua Lake have done, provides some flexibility.

Chautauqua County residents, however, have fought being flexible for years. It is why mergers and consolidations of the smallest bits of government and schools have been defeated over that past 30 years.

We are running out of other choices.

[OCDB, When funds and staff shrink the first thing you need to ask is are you shrinking existing bloat, which isn’t a bad thing. When a bubble has been created you have 2 choices; Take corrective action and Shrink it, or Continue on til it Bursts!]

Well May 21st is shaping up to be a busy day> Perhaps you’re going to Albany to protest against the egregious violations of our fundamental 2nd amendment rights by NY State gov, or perhaps you’re going somewhere to protest the egregious violations and corruption by the Federal gov with respect to the IRS Scandal. In any case, make sure you also vote on your School budgets and School boards too.

On the IRS issue, here’s a message from our Tea Party friends with local info:

“STTPP will be holding a Protest Outside the IRS Building on  E. 2nd St. & Prendergast Ave Jamestown NY

at 12:00 noon Tuesday May 21st.

It is time to stand up and become a force they cannot ignore. (Events happening across the Country)

On behalf of Tea Party, Patriot groups, 9/12, liberty activists, and the American people, we are calling for anyone and everyone to protest the IRS’ complete abuse of power on Tuesday, May 21, 2013 at noon local time.

The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) is out of control and we need to stand up and let them know that we will not take their intimidation tactics!”